Turns An Ordinary Puff On A Bench Reading
Image Source: Google Image

Turns An Ordinary Puff On A Bench Reading

The puffs are great to sit. Meet your body and give you just the right support where you need. But sometimes a little too much, a little too youthful or casual. We’ve had one for quite some time and we decided it was time to raise it. Literally.

Turns An Ordinary Puff On A Bench Reading
Image Source: Google Image

I built a bench or chair floor and surround it with a little more adult respectability. It will be the perfect place to relax, read a book or take a quick nap without appearing to still have homework to do.

What you need

  • 4 × 4 Wood (fence posts w / newels if available)
  • 1 × 4 Wood
  • 1 x 3 Wood
  • drill / driver w / cover screws and drills
  • Miter Saw
  • Saw
  • Brad Nailer w / brads
  • Wood glue
  • Sander
  • As always the proper safety equipment, including eye protection and gloves

I built a bench or chair floor and surround it with a little more adult respectability. It will be the perfect place to relax, read a book or take a quick nap without appearing to still have homework to do.

Step 1 – Plan for the stock market, and space

I knew I wanted a basic and rear platform sized to support the puff, but also needed to take into account the space is filled. Typically, puffs are easy to rotate around a room and accommodate almost any area of throw. This part, however, is substantially more furniture.

I settled on a 3 feet by 3 feet of interior space. Posts 4 × 4 offset legs, extending the position from there. Then there was the outer frame that holds it together, so the entire footprint was 3 feet 9 inches square.

With the plan in place, I went to the lumberyard and collected all the necessary wood. Beside the 4 × 4, 1 × 4 boards needed for the frame, arms and other support pieces. The seat and back should be fully aligned with slats 1 × 3. Remember, all these dimensions are nominal, so bring your tape measure to the lumberyard for details so you can calculate what you need.

Turns An Ordinary Puff On A Bench Reading
Image Source: Google Image

Step 2 – Preparation Part

With all the wood back in the shop, it was time to begin construction. I used a power miter saw to cut the posts 4 × 4 to size.

The forelegs were 2 meters high and 3 feet back. Then cut Tables 1 × 4 which would mask out the entire bank. The corners were chambered for a clean look finished.

The use of cover screws, I attached Tables 1 × 4 for legs posts 4 × 4, the creation of the initial square of the piece. Wanting to keep the piece close to the ground, I measured at the top of the frame piece was 8 inches from the ground. Throughout the process, I drilled pilot holes for the screws on the cover. You may not need to do this to make a cover, but my materials were not as robust and division had to keep to a minimum.

more 1x4s court again used the cover screws to attach the beams of the inside of the frame which support the slats of the seat.

Then I held a board 1 × 4 to the front posts and support back and describes the angle in the wood. In the miter saw, I changed the angle to match the line drawn and cut. These weapons were also united with deck screws.

A straight piece of 1 × 4 went through the two posts back after a beam vertically attached to it and the bottom of the piece to create a support slats back.

Step 3 – Minor adjustments and slats

Stepping back to look, I decided that the front seats were too square and unattractive.

With a circular saw, cut inside corners off at 45 degrees.

Because the saw was not big enough for all wood outside, I finished the cut with a handsaw.

Now the bank seemed an inviting place to sit. Just did not have a seat. Or a back. So it was time to turn the miter saw again and start cutting slats 1 × 3.

The first two strips were a different length than the others to accommodate for the forelegs. In an effort to create an even cleaner look to the piece, I give myself cut the first strip which wraps around the front legs notches. The second bar fits exactly between the legs.

From there, the tablets were all of the same length throughout the bank’s headquarters, so they set a stop at the side of the miter saw in that distance and began to cut the slats after bar.

The back slats were a bit shorter, as they only fell on the vertical posts, so adjust the stop block before cutting those.

Everything was dry equipped to ensure that mathematics was correct and there was not much difference between the seat and back. Once everything was in place, it was time that is final.

Turns An Ordinary Puff On A Bench Reading
Image Source: Google Image

Step 4 – Many of the brads

I took all the slats and wood glue ran across any framework that would come in contact with, for additional insurance.

Then we fill the air compressor, loaded nail guns and started shooting brads. Each slat has brads at each point of contact, creating a good solid foundation for long-term use.

The process was pretty quick, that was fine, because the next step was a little slow.

Turns An Ordinary Puff On A Bench Reading
Image Source: Google Image

Step 5 – Sand and Finish

Running two sanders, they tore down the fluff on the tablets. The other wood had some hard edges eased by sanders as well. The air remaining in the compressor is used to blow the saw dust, leaving a clean surface ready for relaxation.

The placement of the bean bag in the bank suddenly gave an almost majestic appearance. Wood might get painted at some point, but still naked like this, the piece has a nice casual feel, which fit nicely in a den.

When it’s time to relax with a paperback book or an e-reader, we can do it on the floor and surrounded by my work.

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